Moreover

Repot a plant


Repot a plant


Repotting is the operation by which a plant is transported from a smaller container to a larger one. Repotting is used to keep the plant growing and to avoid spiraling the roots, which are forced into too narrow a space. It is also fundamental for maintaining the balance between the aerial part and the radical part, as well as re-establishing the ideal agronomic conditions for plant development.
Each of these reasons, which we are now going to examine in detail, sees its validity confirmed if the repotting is not carried out. If you do not proceed with repotting following the plant growth cycle, in fact, you risk premature aging of the plant with the loss of all its ornamental characteristics. The spiraling of the roots, on the other hand, causes a stunted development of the plant which later, if it is planted in open soil, will not be able to colonize it adequately and eventually succumb to weeds. To correct the spiraling it will be necessary to proceed with a pruning of the root system. The repotting, moreover, is necessary when the soil conditions, with the passage of time, are no longer suitable for the growth of the plant: for example it can happen that the accumulation of limestone contained in the irrigation water changes the ph of the substrate.
To repot, place a gravel layer on the bottom, above the drain hole, to facilitate water drainage and partially fill the planter with soil so that the ground bread of the plant reaches the edge of the pot. Place the earthen bread, compacted with abundant watering 12 hours before, on the soil, then fill the spaces with more soil and compacted. The collar, that is the passage area between the stem and the roots, must remain just outside the soil and in winter it must be protected with a mulch of dry leaves or straw.